State Responsibility for Human Rights Violations Committed in the State Territory by Armed Non-State Actors

Our new publication State Responsibility for Human Rights Violations Committed in the State Territory by Armed Non-State Actors explores the particular aspects of state responsibility for human rights violations committed by armed non-state actors (ANSAs) in its territory.

As a general fact, a state is only responsible for its own acts. But there are exceptional circumstances in which the conduct of an ANSA will invoke a state's responsibility.

The author, Tatyana Eatwell, explores various scenarios, including situations where an ANSA operates independently of any state and controls territory. She acknowledges that these situations of de facto control over a territory by an ANSA give rise to a protection gap where victims of human rights violations committed by the ANSA are left without recourse to remedy.

AUTHOR

Tatyana Eatwell

NEWS AND EVENTS

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New Publication Explores State Responsibility for Human Rights Violations Committed by Armed Non-State Actors in its Territory

February 2019

Part of our multi-year project that focuses on human rights responsibilities and armed non-state actors (ANSAs), our new publication explores the particular aspects of state responsibility for human rights violations committed by ANSAs in its territory.

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