Information

6-10 September 2021
Application start 24 January 2021
Application end 20 August 2021
Fee: 1250 Swiss Francs

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Peasants

A farmer in her field, DRC A farmer in her field, DRC

The United Nations (UN) Declaration on the rights of peasants and other people working in rural areas (UNDROP) was adopted in 2018.

How was it achieved? What does it mean for the protection and promotion of the rights of peasants, rural women, fisher, pastoralist and nomadic communities, as well as agricultural workers? What are the roles of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and representatives of peasants and other people working in rural areas in the implementation of the UNDROP? How can UN human rights mechanisms monitor its implementation? Which lessons can be learned from the implementation of the UN Declaration on the rights of indigenous peoples (UNDRIP) adopted in 2007?

This training course helps participants to respond to these questions. It analyses the origins, drafting and content of the UNDROP, and provides participants with practical tools to include the UNDROP in their work. Two examples of national implementation – in Colombia and Switzerland – are discussed. Themes covered include the rights of rural women, as well as the rights to food and food sovereignty, land and other natural resources, and seeds and biological diversity.

Participants will have the opportunity to engage with international human rights experts and with representatives of states, international organizations, NGOs and peasant movements who contributed to the adoption of the UNDROP.

Online

This short course is offered exclusively online.

Programme

The course covers the following issues:

  • History and negotiation of the UNDROP
  • Content, rights and obligations in the UNDROP
  • Lessons learned from the implementation of the UNDRIP
  • Gender equality and the rights of rural women
  • Rights of agricultural workers
  • Rights to food, food sovereignty, land and other natural resources, seeds and biological diversity
  • Roles of states, international organizations, NGOs and social movements in the implementation of the UNDROP
  • Role of UN human rights mechanisms in monitoring the UNDROP
  • National implementation – the examples of Colombia and Switzerland.

Objectives

At the end of this course, participants will be:

  • Knowledgeable about the history and drafting of the UNDROP
  • Familiar with the content of the UNDROP
  • Able to identify and effectively describe violations of the UNDROP
  • Able to integrate tools for implementing and monitoring the UNDROP in their work
  • Able to discuss challenges in the implementation of specific rights enshrined in the UNDROP, such as the rights of rural women, as well as the rights to food, food sovereignty, land and other natural resources, seeds and biological diversity
  • Familiar with the roles of states, international organizations, NGOs, and representatives of peasants and other people working in rural areas in the implementation of the UNDROP
  • Aware of the role that UN human rights mechanisms can play in monitoring the implementation of the UNDROP.

Lecturers

The training course is given by members of academia and senior professionals from the Geneva Academy, international organizations, including from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the UN Development Programme (UNDP), the International Labour Organization (ILO), and the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), as well as by representatives of states, NGOs and peasant organizations.

Methodology

The course is interactive and participants are encouraged to share their own experiences and perspectives on the issues. The training sessions include lectures and discussions with experts, as well as practical examples and case studies. Sessions are designed to enhance knowledge exchange with peers and facilitators.

Audience

This training course is designed for staff of NGOs, social movements, peasant organizations, development and human rights institutions, UN bodies and other international organizations, as well as representatives of governments and members of academia.

Certification

Participants who successfully complete the training course receive a certificate of participation from the Geneva Academy.

Fee

The training fee for this five-day programme is 1,250 Swiss Francs (30 percent discount for PhD and master students). In case of cancellation by the participant, CHF 200 won't be returned.

How to Apply

 Applications must be submitted via the online application form.

If you have questions, do not hesitate to contact us: rightsofpeasants[at]geneva-academy.ch

Professors and Lecturers

Picture of Joanna Bourke Martignoni

Joanna Bourke Martignoni

Senior Research Fellow

Joanna Bourke Martignoni's research areas include the right to food, land commercialization, climate change, the right to education and gender equality.

Picture of Christophe Golay

Christophe Golay

Senior Research Fellow and Strategic Adviser on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights

Christophe Golay's expertise relates to economic, social and cultural rights, the right to food and the rights of peasants.

Location

Online course

Access

This course will be conducted online using the ZOOM platform.

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